1. Home
  2. Design Culture
  3. Materials and innovations
  4. Eco-design among comfort and recycling

Vitra, Tip Ton Re chair - design Barber&Osgerby

| Designbest editorial staff

I

nnovative materials with a low environmental impact, recycling, wellness and all-round sustainability. These are the themes we pay most attention today when we think about our homes and furniture. Indeed, the circular economy and the safeguarding of the planet have become two essentials pillars of the creativity that is pushing the world of design forward today.

There are increasingly more green companies that not only introduce new products, but also entire eco-friendly production processes: from materials that take advantage of waste and discontinued products to supply chains that aim for energy savings and a reduction of company waste, as well as the obtainment of certifications that protect the environment.

Recently added to more traditional materials, there are new recycled or recyclable compounds capable of guaranteeing high performances and the same quality, without comprising aesthetics and functionality, and giving new value to the objects that surround us.

So why not take advantage of them and look to purchase a new piece of furniture with this in mind? At the moment we are living our homes with greater intensity and spending a lot more time sitting between our walls. This might the right occasion to look to change old chairs.

For example, Pedrali continues on with its green mission with the Recycled grey collection exclusively made up of sustainable material. It is recognizable by the grey color that hides the typical imperfections of recycled materials. Babila Xl designed by Odo Fioravanti stands out among the latest releases. This 100% recycled polypropylene chair is made up of 50% of post-consumer plastic materials and 50% by containers and industrial films. An intelligent way to save material that would otherwise be discarded, it requires “accurate tests and analyses so that it can become a high-quality raw material fit for furniture” as explained Giuseppe Pedrali, CEO of Pedrali. Super-resistant but light, Babila Xl withstands temperatures from +50°C to -10°C , can also be used outside and is easily cleaned.

Pedrali, Babila XL Recycled Grey armchair - design Odoardo Fioravanti

 

Tip Ton Re by Vitra is another interesting new release. It is made with an innovative polymeric material that comes from German domestic plastic waste. Designed by Edward Barber & Jay Osgerby in 2011, the chair that reinterprets the old rocking chair and aids in back support with its two different positions, has now been proposed in this eco-friendly version. It is totally recyclable and each chair is unique as classic grey always presents different miniscule spots of other colors due to the light variations in the recycled material. Perfect for our home office, the kid’s room or dining room, Tip Ton Re is ergonomic and space-saving because it supports the pelvis and the spinal cord with light rocking and can also be stacked.

vitra

Vitra, Tip Ton RE chair - design Barber&Osgerby

 

On the other hand, Bell Chair by Magis encapsulates the concept of a closed supply chain because it is made with a patented material that excludes almost all “virgin or new” materials and is 100% recyclable after its use. Cheap, versatile, enveloping and responsible, this chair designed by Konstantin Grcic is made entirely in recycled propylene obtained from waste generated from Magis’ own furniture production and the local car industry. Moreover, it is also extremely light (it weighs only 2.7 kg, at least a kilo and a half less than the average plastic chair) which means less material used with a consequent reduction in the energy consumed in making it. Lastly, even the pallet for the transportation follows the same philosophy. It was purposefully designed to be reusable and reduce clutter during transportation, and it can hold up to 24 stacked chairs. It provides absolute comfort that is good both for us and the environment.

Magis, Bell Chair - design Konstantin Grcic

 

.

share on: